12-Week Training Phase (Current)

Educating our community about the why behind our programming is important to us. Below is a high level overview of our current 12-week phase of training outlining the focus and corresponding benefits.

Week 1-3

Focus – Tempo

Benefits – Increases deceleration strength, improves overall strength, increases lean body mass, and improves power output.

Week 4-6 (We’re on week 4!)

Focus Pauses

Benefits – Improves joint stability, improves ability to re-accelerate, improves strength and power output. 

Week 7-10 

Focus – Concentric (emphasis on acceleration)

Benefits – Improves all aspects of muscle control. 

Week 11-12 

Focus – Maximal Strength Phase

Benefits – Prepares the muscles to handle heavy loads over 88% in anticipation for max week. 


Accessory Lifts

Focus – Unilateral Work

Benefits – Helps balance strength through the body to ensure right and left sides are as balanced as possible. This phase also stimulates the muscles at a much higher rate, which improves lean body mass, movement mechanics, and muscle hypertrophy and can also cause increased soreness!

Conditioning Days

Focus – Improve strength of movements, sprinting and accelerative movements.

Benefits – To help finish out the ski year this will help keep power output high on the slopes while keeping muscle soreness low. This will also help prepare for spring and summer seasons i.e. (Running, Cycling, Hiking, and Swimming).

Why focus on sprinting?
Sprinting helps improve performance in almost every activity/sport including, but not limited to, Olympic & Powerlifting, Cycling, Hiking, Swimming, and Skiing.

Feel free to pull up the following peer reviewed research articles cited below for more detailed information on the benefits of sprinting!

References
Esfarjani, F., & Laursen, P. B. (2007). Manipulating high-intensity interval training: effects on V˙ O2max, the lactate threshold and 3000 m running performance in moderately trained males. Journal of science and medicine in sport, 10(1), 27-35.

Gist, N. H., Fedewa, M. V., Dishman, R. K., & Cureton, K. J. (2014). Sprint interval training effects on aerobic capacity: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sports medicine, 44(2), 269-279.

Girold, S., Maurin, D., Dugue, B., Chatard, J. C., & Millet, G. (2007). Effects of dry-land vs. resisted-and assisted-sprint exercises on swimming sprint performances. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 21(2), 599-605.

McBride, J. M., Triplett-McBride, T. R. A. V. I. S., Davie, A., & Newton, R. U. (1999). A comparison of strength and power characteristics between power lifters, Olympic lifters, and sprinters. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 13(1), 58-66.

Cronin, J. B., & Hansen, K. T. (2005). Strength and power predictors of sports speed. J Strength Cond Res, 19(2), 349-357.

Esfarjani, F., & Laursen, P. B. (2007). Manipulating high-intensity interval training: effects on V˙ O2max, the lactate threshold and 3000 m running performance in moderately trained males. Journal of science and medicine in sport, 10(1), 27-35.

Kim, J., Lee, N., Trilk, J., Kim, E. J., Kim, S. Y., Lee, M., & Cho, H. C. (2011). Effects of sprint interval training on elite Judoists. International journal of sports medicine, 32(12), 929-934.