Current Training Phase June

Max Testing Week (May 30th – June 4th)

You may have heard us in class talking about what percentage of weight you should be lifting. If you’ve never paid attention to this before, now is the time! Knowing what your one-rep max (1RM) helps you become more refined and accurate in your training program. 

During this test week, please remember the following:

1. If you are a newer member, or are simply uncomfortable with lifting this heavy, there will be an alternate program for you – just like our usual classes that have multiple options each week. 

2. We are finding our training max, not a competition max. This means, we are looking for what maximum weight you can lift for one rep with close-to-perfect form. We are not professional lifters looking for a world record. Please remember safety comes first and that if you over-do it or your form breaks down, you will not have an accurate representation of your 1-RM. This could lead to poor technique and a higher risk of injury in your next training block. 

3. It’s okay if you don’t hit a new PR! While you have been dedicated in your training, life happens. Just remember that this is one data-point in your journey, and data leads to learning and growth!

June 5th – 11th: Deload Week

After a very successful test week, it is time for a much deserved deload week (June 6-10). Throughout the deload week, volume and intensity for all exercises will decrease allowing the body to recover and adapt to the previous block, while also preparing for the next block of training. With that being said, classes will be slightly shorter in length so that more time can be taken stretching, foam rolling, and recovering after class rather than continuing to stress the body. We want you to continue being active outside of the weight room during deload week, whether its hiking or playing a pickup game of basketball. Movement throughout the day/week helps the body recover from other strenuous activities such as resistance training.

It is crucial during deload week to take a step back and ensure other training variables outside of the weight room are being prioritized, including quality sleep throughout the night, hydration, and diet.

Dolezal, S. M., Frese, D. L., & Llewellyn, T. L. (2016). The Effects of Eccentric, Velocity-Based Training on Strength and Power in Collegiate Athletes. International journal of exercise science9(5), 657–666.

Schoenfeld, B.J., Ogborn, D. & Krieger, J.W. Effects of Resistance Training Frequency on Measures of Muscle Hypertrophy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Sports Med 46, 1689–1697 (2016).